Instrumented and Connected: Designing Next-Generation Learning Experiences

Seminar

Tovi Grossman

When
Thursday, January 12, 2017 -
10:30am to 11:30am
Where
Newell-Simon Hall 1305 (Michael Mauldin Auditorium)
Description

The history of computing is rich with examples of how computers, among their many purposes, serve as tools which enhance our ability to learn. As these computing technologies advance, so too do the ways in which we learn.
 
Today, we are moving faster than ever towards Weiser’s seminal vision of technology being woven into the fabric of our everyday lives. Not only have we adopted mobile, and more recently, wearable technologies, that we depend on almost every hour of our waking lives, there is an internet, and more recently, an Internet of Things, that connects us to each other and our surrounding environments. This unique combination of instrumentation and connectivity offers an opportunity to fundamentally change the way in which we learn and share knowledge with one another.
 
In this talk, I will outline my research in what I define as next-generation learning experiences, which leverage instrumented and connected environments to aid in human learning and performance. I first demonstrate how instrumented and connected environments can be used to improve the way in which we learn to use complex software applications. I then discuss how wearable and IoT technologies can be similarly leveraged to aid in the learning, performance, and coordination of real-world physical tasks.

Speaker's Bio

Tovi Grossman is a Distinguished Research Scientist at Autodesk Research, located in downtown Toronto. Dr. Grossman’s research is in HCI, focusing on input and interaction with new technologies. In particular, he has been exploring how emerging technologies, such as wearables, the Internet of Things, and gamification can be leveraged to enhance learning and knowledge sharing for both software applications and real-world physical tasks. This work has led to a number of technologies now in Autodesk products used by millions of users, such as Autodesk Screencast and Autodesk ToolClip™ videos. Dr. Grossman received a Ph.D. in Human-Computer Interaction from the Department of Computer Science at the University of Toronto. He has over 80 peer-reviewed journal and conference publications. Fourteen of these publications have received best paper awards and nominations at the ACM UIST and CHI conferences. He has also served as the Technical Program Co-Chair for the ACM CHI 2014 Conference, and the Program Co-Chair for the ACM UIST 2015 Conference.